Tuesday, April 01, 2008

The Daniel Webster Program


I just got done with a fascinating interview with Professor James Murphy. Prof. Murphy has created the "Daniel Webster Program", a two part initiative. The first part looks to help students find classes that have permanence—a sort of optional core curriculum. The second sponsors two events each year: a conference in the fall that looks at a problem from both ancient and modern perspectives (next fall will be Socrates and Rousseau on Education), and a lecture in the spring called the Janus Lecture. The first Janus Lecture will be a week from this Friday at four in the afternoon. Anthony Kronman, former Dean of Yale Law School and current advocate for the core, will be discussing his new book. Prof. Murphy will also be there to talk about the Daniel Webster Program. Click on the picture for more details.

Finally, I encourage everyone to go to the Daniel Webster Program's website for more information. At the site you can find more about the rationale behind the Program, as well as things like proposed core minors, with titles like "The Abrahamic Faiths", "Epic Literature in Comparison", "What is a Good Human Life?", and more. Go have a look.

P.S. Prof. Murphy told me to encourage people to give feedback about the program. You can do that on the Program's site.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Man, that guy knows how to make a tasteful flier.

How soon before Dartmouth College tells him he can't just go around using its name to advertise his program, even if it's free?

Anonymous said...

Where does it say Dartmouth College on the poster?

Anonymous said...

A most impressive site. Note especially the arguments that justify the value of a core curriculum, its suggested curriculum by subject matter and historic author, and its suggestions for "touchstone" Dartmouth courses.

The Daniel Webster program should have the support of all liberal educators, but methinks it will be resisted by most.

Anonymous said...

It is only fair to keep an open mind about the objectives of "The Daniel Webster Program". At the same time, Professor Murphy was a participating panelist at the ultra-conservative Pope Foundation semniar on Oct. 27 along with Todd Zywicki. He was also a panelist with Zywicki at the very conservative National Association of Scholars semniar on Nov. 19.
A coincidence? Possibly. However, the agenda of this program may be more than as advertised.

Anonymous said...

"I just got done...."

Dartmouth? I don't think so.

A. S. Erickson said...

Sorry, it probably should have been something more like "I recently found myself in the fortunate position to have concluded a...", right?

anon. 10:22 said...

@anon. 10:57, the poster refers to Professor Murphy "of the Government Department at Dartmouth" and advertises the program at a dartmouth.edu website. The website goes much further, advertising "THE DANIEL WEBSTER PROGRAM AT DARTMOUTH COLLEGE" and "Introducing The Daniel Webster Program at Dartmouth College." No school that uses "at Dartmouth College" to identify its programs and divisions (the official name of Tuck is "The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College") can afford to give this guy free reign.

He should either get the College to review the program or stop implying official endorsement in the name while disclaiming it in the text.

Anonymous said...

why are you so threatened? I looked at hte website. he's clearly not a western civ zealot.

Anonymous said...

I'm shocked that someone would use the Dartmouth name for personal gain.

It doesn't pay to be too obvious.

Anonymous said...

To anon 1:14pm, here are some other famous "I just got done's..."

"But I just got done anticipating the last thing nobody could have anticipated"?" - George W. Bush
TUESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2008

Discussion: I just got done watching Cocaine Cowboys - Flipbook 3/31

I just got done watching it
February 22, 2008 - 23:11 ET by bigtimer on News Busters blog

I just got done writing a review of Grand Theft Auto - Rick Broida blog

I just got done sending this message