Monday, March 24, 2008

Goeglein Still Plagiarizing, Beck '04 Weighs In


TDR alumnus Stefan Beck '04 weighs in at Pajamas Media on the plagiarism scandal involving Timothy Goeglein and Jeffrey Hart:

These words, along with several subsequent paragraphs, were cut from a 1998 Dartmouth Review essay by Professor Emeritus Jeffrey Hart. As a former editor of The Dartmouth Review and an admirer of Prof. Hart, I was disappointed by his reaction to Goeglein’s apology: “I told him I was flattered he’d used it. It doesn’t damage him in my estimation at all. I’m glad he spread the word.” He told the Review that it should “take a bow” for publishing material good enough to get noticed. (Now imagine your Merc’s been stolen, and a cop is patting you on the back for having owned such a desirable automobile.)

[. . .]

I doubt that Prof. Hart was aware, when he made his comments, of the extent of the cutting and pasting. According to Nancy Nall, Goeglein lifted lengthy passages from such distinguished writers as Eric Ormsby, Jonathan Yardley, and, believe it or not, the Pope. (The opening line of Goeglein’s tribute to William F. Buckley Jr., “Friendship, at its best, is a foretaste of heaven,” was taken, I just now determined, from Aelred of Rievaulx, the patron saint of bladder-stone sufferers. You can’t make this stuff up.) I don’t believe that Prof. Hart would have granted Goeglein the same indulgence had he known the truth. He’d have seen that, to borrow from Ms. Nall, Goeglein “is a man who simply thought he’d found the perfect place to satisfy his need to be an intellectual — a paper hardly anyone reads.”

Read the whole thing here.

6 comments:

John Bruce said...

Prof. Hart is being generous here, as he was with many of us. In fact, I could easily plagiarize words on the web about his generosity. Remember that Goeglein lost his job in consequence of the plagiarism, when it actually had nothing to do with his job performance, and now he has to rebuild his career. If he gets another political public liaison job, I doubt if the plagiarism episode will discomfit his new employer, after all.

Anonymous said...

There's a reason he's known as "Easy Jeff."

Anonymous said...

Now imagine your Merc’s been stolen, and a cop is patting you on the back for having owned such a desirable automobile.

Shitty analogy.

Anonymous said...

Funny how Phil Aubart complains about "flat-out lies" while constructing his entire column around a single Big Lie, which is the idea that the administration is sending funds to Dartmouth Undying. Of course he spends more than 680 words on the topic without giving any reason to take his word for it, because he doesn't have any evidence at all.

Why would he believe alumni alone could come up with the cash to pay for the big ads in the New York Times, the plaintiff's counsel in the law suit, and the Hanover Institute nonprofit (he thinks some nonprofits are bad?), but not have enough to put up a simple website without asking for help from the administration? Are only conservative alumni allowed to be wealthy?

Anonymous said...

One wonders what Phil Aubart has been reading (smoking?) if he thinks that "The second [official slate] is only offered because the nomination committee agreed to nominate any incumbents who wanted to run for re-election."

There is no second slate. There is one official slate, and one petition slate. This thing he's talking about no longer exists. And he's accusing someone else of lying?

Anonymous said...

Looks like it's time to bring Phil Aubart before COS for plagiarism.

Aubart wrote:

Spalding, the executive committee secretary -- and also the College's vice-president for Alumni Relations -- stated in a committee meeting that the administration, which earlier dismissed the lawsuit as having "no legal basis," would spare no effort in ensuring the defeat of lawsuit supporters.

But the minutes of that meeting can be checked on line and do not show Spalding saying anything of the sort. Instead, Phil lifted both the words and meaning without attribution from Frank Gado:

At a meeting not long ago, Executive Committee Secretary David Spalding, who is also the College’s Vice President of Alumni Relations, stated that the administration would spare no effort in order to defeat those of us who have opposed the Board’s actions.