Thursday, April 21, 2005

Chief Wah Hoo Says...

No Dartmouth Commencement is complete without a Dartmouth Indian cane. Pick one up at the Review's Indian Store and join more than 100 years of graduation tradition. Please contact President@DartReview.com for bulk purchase pricing for groups and organizations. Also, only 10 days remain in the April Indian shirt sale. All short-sleeve shirts marked down from $15 to $10 and long sleeve, $20 to $15. As one loyal reader put it, "pick up a cane and then, gripping firmly the smooth, rounded head of said cane, take part in graduation, which has attached to it more than 200 years of tradition[!]"

8 comments:

George Wukoson said...

"No Dartmouth Commencement is complete without a Dartmouth Indian cane."

In that case, I'll make sure and pick one up. I do have a question though. If one is a Native American, is it enough stand there without the cane?

Keep on truckin' guys,
George

Kevin C. Hudak said...
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Kevin C. Hudak said...

"If one is a Native American, is it enough stand there without the cane?"

I can't answer that question without your help, George. Who needs a Native American up there when we can just toss on-stage one of the many bleeding-hearts like yourself to represent with impunity the beliefs and values of a diverse group of people. Isn't that your modus operandi, or have you not received your talking points from Ed. 20 yet?

Chris Bateman said...

Dear Kevin,

You raise an interesting point. I'm sure you're familiar with Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" I would love to hear you elaborate your position on the problem of representing "the Other" when the Other is underrepresented, the theoretical problem I believe is at hand here. Is it unethical to attempt such a discursive leap of sympathy, or empathy, with the goal in mind of empowering the Other?

Your truly,
Chris

George Wukoson said...

"Isn't that your modus operandi, or have you not received your talking points from Ed. 20 yet?"

Responding to my borderline rude but still relevant criticism with a simple and inaccurate stereotype does not seem to be the MO of an educated journalist such as yourself Mr. Hudak. Chris forwarded me the well thought out blitz you sent him. Your complaints about uncritically confrontational "bleeding-hearts" might have a bit more merit if you posted something as well thought out (albiet, imho, wrong) as said blitz rather than something as silly and aggressively naive as "Chief Wah Hoo Says..." My point is simple: I responded to your Review talking points (and don't deny that that's what they are) with my own equivalent.

Anonymous said...

If the Indian-head cane is "a tradition that can be traced back to 1898" (the year of the earliest Indian-head cane still surviving in the archives at Baker, according to the article you linked to), then wouldn't it have to wait until 2098 to be "more than 200 years of graduation tradition"?

Or do you mean "pick up a cane and then, gripping firmly the smooth, rounded head of said cane, take part in graduation, which has attached to it more than 200 years of tradition"?

Kevin C. Hudak said...

"Or do you mean "pick up a cane and then, gripping firmly the smooth, rounded head of said cane, take part in graduation, which has attached to it more than 200 years of tradition"?"

It was an error on my part. I'm a journalist, not a math major, as it would seem. Though I do like your explanation better...Perhaps you can write the text of the item description for the Indian store?

TO said...

Maybe the "200 years of tradition" refers to "taking part in graduation,"

not necessarily doing so while holding a Dartmouth Indian cane, which apparently only has 107 years of tradition attached to it...